You can expect to pay between $700 to $3,000 to paint wood siding. You’ll end up spending $1 to $3 per square foot, but typically you’ll find this material is cheaper than brick or vinyl. Wood requires some type of sealant, be it paint, stain or oil. Lumber takes well to a wide variety of coverings giving you endless options for modern, contemporary or classic looks. Some things to consider when choosing wood: Thornton Home Painting
To calculate the cost of an interior paint job that you do yourself, measure the square footage of the interior space you need to paint. Consider whether you will need primer or multiple coats to help with your color transition. If you’re just adding another layer of the same color of paint you used a few years back, you may be able to use a single coat and skip the primer.
Protect wood fences and deck with exterior stains and wood sealers. A few coats can keep your deck vibrant, healthy and looking great for years. Or, go for more of a restore by treating your deck to new colors or texture with deck paint. Remember, cleaning is an essential part of the project. It will stop premature peeling and make your exterior paint last longer. Pro tip: Take at least as much time to prep as you will for painting. 
Your contractor will sweep or scrub the concrete first with a dry brush, and then clean it thoroughly with trisodium phosphate (TSP) and warm water, then let it dry. TSP is a mostly alkaline solution that does a great job cleaning grease and oil off concrete surfaces. Brush painting concrete siding costs $138 per 100 sq. ft., roll painting costs $50 per 100 sq. ft., and spray painting $32 per 100 sq. ft. House Painting Thornton
Exterior paint prep can be a daunting task to tackle. Depending on the size of the project and your experience level, you might not even know where to begin. Like everything, the best way to start is with a good plan. Identify what parts of the project can be broken into sections and what parts need to be done together. Look for areas that will cause you trouble, so that you can approach them with your eyes open. The planning stage is also the best time to consider testing for lead paint. If you have a house that was built prior to 1979, it's always a good idea to know what you're getting into. This is especially important because it's likely that you'll need to sand or scrape your existing exterior paint during the course of your project. See this Family Handyman article Testing for Lead Paint for more details on how to easily and affordably find out if you have lead paint.
Whether you decide to do the preparation work yourself or have a professional do it as part of your project, proper preparation makes all the difference in creating a smooth and lasting finish. Do it correctly the first time or you’ll quickly end up spending more to fix peeling and chipping paint. Follow this process before starting on your home's exterior. Keep in mind that the process may vary based on your siding materials:
As you remove the loose paint from your home by sanding and scraping, you'll likely notice individual areas that have become damaged. The damage might be from weather wear and tear, or possibly from animal or insect activity. Regardless of the cause, this is the perfect time to make repairs. This Family Handyman article on exterior paint prep reviews a number of the possible types of damage and how to address them. Once the repairs are done, you can clean off the surface. Sanding dust and debris will come off with a quick wipe down or air spray. But if part of the home is especially dirty — especially from road dirt kicked up by traffic — you may need to scrub the siding, either by hand or with a power washer. If you do opt for power washing, be careful not to spray upward. Always direct the sprayer so that the force of the washer moves in the same direction as rainfall. Your siding was designed to shed rainfall, not protect from water coming at it from below. See How to Pressure Wash a House for more details.

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A single gallon of paint can run anywhere from $20 to $80 per gallon. Professionals get a contractor discount of anywhere from 25 to 50 percent. For rough siding, like stucco, you’ll need to use 10% to 20% more paint. Some textures, like wood and stucco, require extra paint because they have more surface to cover in a tiny area compared to smooth siding. Use the highest quality exterior paint your budget will allow for your project. It will look the nicest and save you money by offering better coverage and durability. Better coverage means fewer coats and fewer work hours. You’ll also go a few years longer without needing to shell out more cash for a new coat. How do you know how much paint you're paying for? Here's some helpful math:
There have been instances of unscrupulous individuals pouring inexpensive paint into expensive paint buckets and overcharging customers. Make sure you have your painting contractor write exactly what type of paint products will be used to complete the job. Also, if you specify a brand, include that and the exact shade. It may seem silly, but making sure all of this is in writing will save you from misunderstandings and unnecessary obstacles to finishing your renovation. Thornton House Painters
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