The real bulk of the work in exterior paint prep is surface prep. And make sure to avoid these missteps. The most difficult part of that prep is sanding and scraping. If you're working on an unpainted surface, you can give it a quick prep and move on. But most previously painted surfaces will need to have loose and flaking paint scraped off and the edges sanded flush. This is a tedious and tiring process, but it's an incredibly important part of the process. Painting over flaking paint will only result in new paint that flakes off, and skipping the sanding process will leave large, unsightly "divot" areas on your home. Power sanders can help speed the work, but be sure to use proper respiration and dust control. See this article on painting preparation for more tips on the critical steps of sanding and scraping. Thornton House Painters
Lap marks are those ugly stripes caused by uneven layers of paint buildup. They occur when you roll over paint that’s already partly dry. (In warm, dry conditions, latex paint can begin to stiffen in less than a minute!) The key to avoiding lap marks  when doing DIY wall painting is to maintain a “wet edge,” so each stroke of your roller overlaps the previous stroke before the paint can begin to dry. Thornton House Painters

If you have outdoor pets, give some thought to how this project will affect them. Especially if you're painting your house, you'll be moving around the perimeter and dragging supplies behind you. Also, when you're in the midst of sanding and scraping, watch where the debris falls. It's not uncommon for pets to chew on strange materials that suddenly fall into their domain. None of this is to say that you can't run an exterior paint prep project with pets in the area. It's just a good idea to keep their presence in mind. And, if your pets get stressed out or overly excited about all the commotion outside, here's a list of 10 gadgets to help distract them. House Painting Thornton
Once you have the approximate square footage that you’ll need to paint, remember that a gallon of paint generally covers between 250 and 400 square feet. You’ll need more if you’re painting a rough, porous material, or if you want to paint a dark house a much lighter color. Depending on your color choice, you may need a more expensive tinted primer to help with the color transition. Thornton House Painters
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